Elion House at The World Federation of Scientists, Erice, Italy

Elion House, Tatsuo Masuda, presents on the economic and financial impact of COVID- 19. He is a Panel Member, World Federation of Scientists and Strategic Committee Member, Elion House.

A sustainable investment in environmental technologies for a green and resilient recovery. There are clear connections between COVID-19 and the climate crisis. Climate change increases the likelihood of COVID-type pandemics – through changes in the habitats of disease vectors, for example, increased inter-species contact resulting from deforestation.

The World Bank estimates that 40-60 million people will be driven into extreme poverty in 2020. Similarly, climate change will generate events that escalate and proliferate, from multiple breadbasket failures to climate-induced conflicts and refugee crises. COVID-19 is in many ways unprecedented, but climate change threatens to produce shocks of greater magnitude that play out over longer timeframes IPCC special report, Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018

Elion House at RiskMinds 2019 – Climate Risks Impact on Investment Portfolios

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RiskMinds 2019 – World’s leading risk management event. Manage emerging risks. Embrace technology. Challenge culture. (Learn more)

Elion House CTO/CIO, Benjamin Khoo, made a keynote speech on the impact of climate-related risks and intensifying regulations on global investment portfolios.

The 3 day conference in Hong Kong was attended by global banks, investors, corporates and regulators. Climate change was voted by attendees as one of the top 3 major risks facing organisations alongside cyber attacks and geo-politics.

Elion House at Annual Borrowers & Investors Forum (AsianInvestor), May 2017

CIO, Benjamin Khoo, was invited back to speak on the infrastructure panel in Singapore on how cleantech infrastructure funds are becoming a significant asset class for institutional investors driven by record negative interest rates, the Paris Agreement, and a growing demand for new assets with a low correlation to other assets and the economy.

With the Paris Agreement now in force, he talked about portfolio de-carbonisation and a superior yield offering in cleantech infrastructure with sustainable low-risk cash flows, and how to protect your investment portfolio over the long run via strategic allocations towards ESG-compliant infrastructure or real economy assets.

Before the Flood – Full Movie | National Geographic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90CkXVF-Q8M

Published on Oct 30, 2016

Join Leonardo DiCaprio as he explores the topic of climate change, and discovers what must be done today to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.
➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe
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➡ Discover your climate impact: http://carbotax.org/
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Watch an exclusive sneak peek of MARS: https://youtu.be/CNkcgUuubIE

Act Now #BeforeTheFlood:
For every use of #BeforeTheFlood across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram between October 24 – November 18, 21st Century Fox and National Geographic will together donate $1 to Pristine Seas and $1 to the Wildlife Conservation Society, up to $50,000 to each organization.

About Before the Flood:
Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he interviews individuals from every facet of society in both developing and developed nations who provide unique, impassioned and pragmatic views on what must be done today and in the future to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.

Landmark Paris Agreement to enter into force

Thursday 6 October 2016

With over 55 parties covering more than 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions ratifying the Paris Climate Change Agreement on Thursday, the landmark accord will enter into force in 30 days.

COP21 celebration
World leaders rejoice the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement on December 12, 2015. Less than a year later, the landmark accord is about to enter into force.
The UN’s top climate official today praised nations across the globe for acting swiftly to bring the landmark Paris Climate Change Agreement into force.

“This is a truly historic moment for people everywhere. The two key thresholds needed for the Paris Climate Change Agreement to become legal reality have now been met,” said Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
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‘Climate change is really about the wellbeing of people’
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“The speed at which countries have made the Paris Agreement’s entry into force possible is unprecedented in recent experience of international agreements and is a powerful confirmation of the importance nations attach to combating climate change and realising the multitude of opportunities inherent in the Paris Agreement,” she said.

In a statement issued before the threshold for ratification of the Paris Agreement was crossed, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: “Strong international support for the Paris Agreement entering into force is testament to the urgency for action, and reflects the consensus of governments that robust global cooperation is essential to meet the climate challenge.”

The Paris Agreement was adopted in Paris, France at the UN climate conference in December 2015. In order to enter into force, at least 55 Parties accounting for at least 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions were required, with the Agreement then entering into force 30 days later.

Entry into force bodes well for the urgent, accelerated implementation of climate action that is now needed to realise a better, more secure world and to support also the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals.
Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
Today, the UNFCCC secretariat tracker shows that the number of Parties that have ratified, accepted, or approved the Agreement now covers over 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. This includes the biggest and smallest emitters, the richest and the most vulnerable nations.

“Above all, entry into force bodes well for the urgent, accelerated implementation of climate action that is now needed to realise a better, more secure world and to support also the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals,” Ms. Espinosa said.

“It also brings a renewed urgency to the many issues governments are advancing to ensure full implementation of the Agreement. This includes development of a rule book to operationalise the agreement and how international cooperation and much bigger flows of finance can speed up and scale up national climate action plans,” she added.

Consequences of entry into force
Entry into force triggers a variety of important consequences, including launch of the Agreement’s governing body, known as the CMA. In the parlance of the UN climate change process this stands for the Conference of the Parties to the Convention serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement.

Given that the count-down to entry into force has now been formally triggered, the CMA will take place at the upcoming annual UN climate conference, known as COP22, in Marrakesh, Morocco from November 7-18. Precise dates will be announced in the coming days.

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Moreover, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) – national climate action plans – of Parties which have joined or subsequently join the Agreement transform into Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), which can always be resubmitted as more ambitious plans at any point. A key feature of the Agreement is that these plans can be strengthened at any time but not weakened.

“Climate action by countries, companies, investors and cities, regions, territories and states has continued unabated since Paris and the full implementation of the agreement will ensure that this collective effort will continue to double and redouble until a sustainable future is secured,” said Espinosa.

Governments will also be obligated to take action to achieve the temperature goals enshrined in the Agreement – keeping the average global temperature rise from pre-industrial times below 2 degrees C and pursuing efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees.

The fact that somewhere around one degree of this rise has already happened and global greenhouse gas emissions have not yet peaked underlines the urgency of implementing the Paris Agreement in full.

Another key milestone will be the successful conclusion of negotiations to develop the Paris Agreement’s implementation rule book. Completion of what is, in effect, a global blueprint for reporting and accounting for climate action, need to be completed as soon as possible.

Countries are also not starting from scratch. The many successful models and mechanisms for international climate cooperation set up under the UNFCCC over the past two decades, including the Kyoto Protocol, have built up a deep level of experience and knowledge on how this can be done effectively.

It is the completed rule book that will make the Agreement work and that will make it fully implementable, setting out the detailed requirements under which countries and other actors will openly report and account for the climate action they are taking in a way which promotes trust and confidence across nations to boost their own comprehensive response to the challenge of climate change.

Another key issue is to ensure that the $100 billion, pledged by developed countries to developing ones, is truly building in the run up to 2020 and that even larger sums are being leveraged from investors, banks and the private sector that can build towards the $5 to $7 trillion needed to support a world-wide transformation.

Securing a world which is safer from the extreme climate change that would undermine any attempt at future sustainable development will still take decades of rising action and constant improvement.

“The entry into force of the Paris Agreement is more than a step on the road. It is an extraordinary political achievement which has opened the door to a fundamental shift in the way the world sees, prepares for and acts on climate change through stronger action at all levels of government, business, investment and civil society,” said Espinosa.

China ratifies Paris climate agreement

An aerial view shows a coal-burning power plant on the outskirts of Zhengzhou, Henan province, China, August 28, 2010.
 REUTERS: Signing up to cut emissions means China will have to move away from coal power

China’s top legislature has ratified the Paris global climate agreement, state news agency Xinhua reports.

The country is the world’s largest emitter of harmful CO2 emissions, which cause climate change.

China and the US are expected to jointly announce ratification at a bilateral summit later on Saturday.

In a landmark deal struck in December, countries agreed to cut emissions enough to keep the global average rise in temperatures below 2C (36F).

What is climate change?

What does the climate deal mean for me?

Members of China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee adopted “the proposal to review and ratify the Paris Agreement” on Saturday morning at the end of a week-long session.

The Paris deal is the world’s first comprehensive climate agreement. It will only come into force legally after it is ratified by at least 55 countries, which between them produce 55% of global carbon emissions.


Paris agreement: Key points

  • To keep global temperature increase “well below” 2C (36F) and to pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5C (27F)
  • To peak greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible and achieve a balance between sources and sinks of greenhouse gases in the second half of this century
  • To review progress every five years
  • $100bn a year in climate finance for developing countries by 2020, with a commitment to further finance in the future
  • Once the deal comes into force, countries that have ratified it have to wait for a minimum of three years before they exit

When the US – the world’s second-largest emitter – follows China’s lead, it will bump the tally up to 40%.

Before China made this announcement, the 23 nations that had ratified the agreement accounted for just over 1% of emissions.

Top 10 CO2 emitters

Analysts warn that the target of keeping temperature rises below 2C is already in danger of being breached.

For 14 consecutive months meteorologists have recorded the hottest month on record, and the UK’s Met Office has forecast that 2016 is likely to hit temperatures 1.1C above pre-industrial levels.

Average temperatures worldwide are likely to increase more in the coming years as the effect of previous carbon emissions makes itself felt.

The G20 summit in Hangzhou, starting on Sunday, is a meeting of leaders from 20 countries. It is expected to be Barack Obama’s last trip to Asia as the president of the US.

Mr Obama is expected to announce on Saturday that the US is formally joining the Paris Agreement.

It is thought that he and China’s President Xi Jinping will make a joint announcement at a bilateral meeting.

CEO Pavilion Energy & Chairman of International Enterprise (Singapore) joins as Honorary Adviser

Elion House is pleased to announce the addition of Seah Moon Ming as Honorary Adviser. He is Group Chief Executive Officer of Pavilion Energy, Singapore’s integrated energy company owned by Temasek. Chairman of  International Enterprise (IE) Singapore, the government agency that partners Singapore companies in going global and promotes international trade. IE vision is a thriving business hub in Singapore with Globally Competitive Companies and leading international traders. IE has a global network of overseas centres in over 35 locations which provides the necessary connections in many developed and emerging markets.

Mr Seah is also Chairman of Singapore Cooperation Enterprise, Trusted Board Ltd and China & North Asia Business Group of Singapore Business Federation. He also sits on the board of Singapore Technologies Electronics and Alexandra Health System Pte Ltd.  Mr Seah is a member of the Board of Trustees, SIM University, Singapore and Adjunct Professor at its School of Science & Technology.  He was Chairman of Temasek Polytechnic from 2006 to 2014.

He was conferred the IES/IEEE Joint Medal of Excellence Award 2008 by the Institution of Engineers Singapore (IES) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received the Honorary Fellow Award from the ASEAN Federation of Engineering Organisations (AFEO), as well as Fellow of the ASEAN Academy of Engineering and Technology (AAET).

Mr Seah is a recipient of the Oil Council’s 2014 APAC Executive of the Year Award. Mr Seah is also a recipient of the 2011 Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award, conferred by the NUS Faculty of Engineering. He was awarded the 2006 Asia Brand Innovation – Ten Most Outstanding Personality Award and the 6th International Management Action Award by Chartered Management Institute, Singapore in 2007.

In January 2008, Mr Seah was conferred the title of Honorary Citizen of Guiyang, China. He was named as one of China’s Top 10 International Chinese Achievers for Financial & Intelligent Persons in 2007 by a consortium of organisations, including the Beijing Normal University and the Chinese editions of Fortune and Time magazines.

Mr Seah holds a Bachelor of Engineering with a major in Electronics Engineering from the National University of Singapore and a Master of Science (EE) with distinction from Naval Postgraduate School, USA. He also attended the Stanford-NUS Executive Program and the Management Development & Advanced Management Program at Harvard University.

Tesla’s Rise Has Inspired a Dozen New EV Rivals

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Elon Musk should be blushing.

In addition to the increased competition from big auto manufacturers, there are also now many venture-backed startups that are now kicking tires within the electric vehicle industry. According to Tracxn, a startup intelligence platform, some of Tesla’s rivals include Faraday Future, NextEV, and Atieva.

This set of companies has raised hundreds of millions from prominent venture capitalists in a bold effort to emulate the success of Tesla, which had its shares skyrocket from $17 to north of $200 since the company’s 2010 IPO.

Courtesy of: Visual Capitalist

 

TESLA’S RIVALS

Faraday Future is possibly one of the more interesting names on this list. Backed by Chinese internet billionaire Jia Yueting, the company is notoriously secretive and hasn’t publicly revealed its CEO. It has however, hinted that its technology could potentially help mount a serious challenge to Tesla. Faraday Future executive Nick Sampson, the former head of vehicle and chassis engineering at Tesla, said that the company’s goal was to “revolutionize mobility the same way the iPhone revolutionized the phone industry”.

The company plans to build vehicles with a Variable Platform Architecture (VPA), which allows for vehicles to be built with multiple motors, along with powertrain configurations that can be customized for specific power, range and driving dynamics. Faraday Future recently broke ground on its $1 billion Nevada factory, aiming to launch its first vehicle for sale in 2017.

NextEV, another EV startup with Chinese connections, has reportedly raised more than $500 million from big names including Sequoia Capital, Tencent, and Joy Capital. Started by William Li, who previously founded the largest provider of car-pricing data to Chinese dealers, the company has a similar vision to that of Faraday Future: it plans to focus on connectivity and infotainment features to take the EV beyond just a form of transportation. To help guide in this plan, NextEV has hired Martin Leach, who previously served as the president of Ford Europe and also the CEO of Maserati.

Lastly, Atieva has made recent ground in the EV market after securing the majority-backing of one of China’s largest automakers. Founded in 2007 by Bernard Tse, who was also originally on Tesla’s Board of Directors, Atieva initially planned to provide monitoring software for electric vehicle battery packs. Today, the company has now reportedly moved towards manufacturing EVs with the vision of “redefining what a car can be by building an iconic new vehicle from the ground up”.

Building an electric car company from the ground up is a daunting task, and many imitators have already failed spectacularly. Fisker Automotive, for example, famously declared bankruptcy in 2013 even after burning through $1.4 billion in funding while losing $35,000 per car.

It’s possible this list may look way different in the near future.

Read the original article on Visual Capitalist. Get rich, visual content on business and investing for free at the Visual Capitalist website, or follow Visual Capitalist on Twitter,Facebook, or LinkedIn for the latest. Copyright 2016. Follow Visual Capitalist on Twitter.