Elion House at The World Federation of Scientists, Erice, Italy

Elion House, Tatsuo Masuda, presents on the economic and financial impact of COVID- 19. He is a Panel Member, World Federation of Scientists and Strategic Committee Member, Elion House.

A sustainable investment in environmental technologies for a green and resilient recovery. There are clear connections between COVID-19 and the climate crisis. Climate change increases the likelihood of COVID-type pandemics – through changes in the habitats of disease vectors, for example, increased inter-species contact resulting from deforestation.

The World Bank estimates that 40-60 million people will be driven into extreme poverty in 2020. Similarly, climate change will generate events that escalate and proliferate, from multiple breadbasket failures to climate-induced conflicts and refugee crises. COVID-19 is in many ways unprecedented, but climate change threatens to produce shocks of greater magnitude that play out over longer timeframes IPCC special report, Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018

Elion House at RiskMinds 2019 – Climate Risks Impact on Investment Portfolios

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RiskMinds 2019 – World’s leading risk management event. Manage emerging risks. Embrace technology. Challenge culture. (Learn more)

Elion House CTO/CIO, Benjamin Khoo, made a keynote speech on the impact of climate-related risks and intensifying regulations on global investment portfolios.

The 3 day conference in Hong Kong was attended by global banks, investors, corporates and regulators. Climate change was voted by attendees as one of the top 3 major risks facing organisations alongside cyber attacks and geo-politics.

Elion House Moderates at RiskMinds 2018

CTO/ CIO, Benjamin Khoo, moderates a panel of institutional investors including Swiss Re, Peak Re, and IFC’s Asia Chief Investment Officer who estimates clean energy to be a $20 trillion opportunity.

The panel highlighted a global trend by institutional investors who control around $90 trillion to decarbonise their portfolios away from fossil fuel investments into sustainable investments that meet environmental, social, governance (EST) criteria.

The panel also noted the impact on static portfolio management by disruptive technologies and a need to rethink concepts of finance and business in order to keep up with the pace of technological progress. Many institutional investors and corporations around the world have set up flexible venture capital funds focused on investing in new technologies. Benjamin spoke on how to structure low-risk ESG-compliant cleantech infrastructure assets enabled by emerging clean energy technologies (baseload vs. intermittent power). (Learn more)

RiskMinds is a leading international risk management event produced by Informa.

Elion House at Insurance Forum 2017 (Invesco & AsianInvestor) – Investing by ESG Principles

Panel Discussion “Does Responsible Investing Matter?”, during the Insurance Forum 2017 on 01 June 2017, at the Four Seasons Hotel, Hong Kong, China.

Elion House:

CTI/CIO, Benjamin Khoo, speaks alongside Invesco and BSR at the AsianInvestor Insurance Forum 2017 sponsored by Invesco at the Four Seasons in Hong Kong.

“Over the last 25 years bridging cleantech development and financial engineering, I have noticed a convergence of science and of human consciousness. As new technologies continue to disrupt the world, it is time to rethink concepts of technology, business, and finance, using them as tools to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world. Cleantech infrastructure enabled by new clean energy technologies is a new asset class that is ESG-compliant and can provide investors with low-risk and superior returns over the long-term”.

 Invesco & AsianInvestor:

“Investing according to ESG principles involves the consideration of environmental, social and governance
issues when selecting companies and countries in which to invest.”

“In the past, ESG issues typically resulted in the exclusion
of certain industrial sectors (in armaments, tobacco and
alcohol companies, for example) or certain countries from
investment portfolios. While such ‘exclusion’ techniques are
still widely used, the incorporation of ESG considerations in
investment decisions is now done in a variety of ways.”

“One indicator of the increasing awareness of ESG issues
is the growing number of institutional investors that are
signatories to the United Nations–supported Principles for
Responsible Investment (UN PRI). Invesco became a UN
PRI signatory in 2013. According to PRI, the assets under
management of its signatories have grown from less than
US$7 trillion at PRI’s launch in 2006 to US$62 trillion as of April
2016 (Figure 2), more than three quarters of the global asset
management industry’s assets.”

“As signatories, institutional investors have a duty to act in
the best long-term interests of their beneficiaries. In that
fiduciary role, signatories believe that ESG issues can affect
the performance of investment portfolios and recognise
that applying six key ESG principles may better align
investors with broader objectives of society. The six key
principles are:

• to incorporate ESG issues into investment analysis and
decision-making;
• to be active owners and incorporate ESG issues into
ownership policies and practices;
• to seek appropriate disclosure of ESG issues;
• to promote acceptance and implementation of the
principles in the industry;
• to work together to enhance effectiveness in
implementing the principles and
• to report on activities and progress towards implementing
the principles.”

AsianInvestor Invesco HK FULL -1June2017

Elion House at Annual Borrowers & Investors Forum (AsianInvestor), May 2017

CIO, Benjamin Khoo, was invited back to speak on the infrastructure panel in Singapore on how cleantech infrastructure funds are becoming a significant asset class for institutional investors driven by record negative interest rates, the Paris Agreement, and a growing demand for new assets with a low correlation to other assets and the economy.

With the Paris Agreement now in force, he talked about portfolio de-carbonisation and a superior yield offering in cleantech infrastructure with sustainable low-risk cash flows, and how to protect your investment portfolio over the long run via strategic allocations towards ESG-compliant infrastructure or real economy assets.

Before the Flood – Full Movie | National Geographic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90CkXVF-Q8M

Published on Oct 30, 2016

Join Leonardo DiCaprio as he explores the topic of climate change, and discovers what must be done today to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.
➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe
➡ Get the soundtrack on iTunes: http://apple.co/2e6e9dq
➡ Discover your climate impact: http://carbotax.org/
➡ Learn more & take action: http://on.natgeo.com/2eWxnkW

Watch an exclusive sneak peek of MARS: https://youtu.be/CNkcgUuubIE

Act Now #BeforeTheFlood:
For every use of #BeforeTheFlood across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram between October 24 – November 18, 21st Century Fox and National Geographic will together donate $1 to Pristine Seas and $1 to the Wildlife Conservation Society, up to $50,000 to each organization.

About Before the Flood:
Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he interviews individuals from every facet of society in both developing and developed nations who provide unique, impassioned and pragmatic views on what must be done today and in the future to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet.

Landmark Paris Agreement to enter into force

Thursday 6 October 2016

With over 55 parties covering more than 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions ratifying the Paris Climate Change Agreement on Thursday, the landmark accord will enter into force in 30 days.

COP21 celebration
World leaders rejoice the adoption of the Paris Climate Change Agreement on December 12, 2015. Less than a year later, the landmark accord is about to enter into force.
The UN’s top climate official today praised nations across the globe for acting swiftly to bring the landmark Paris Climate Change Agreement into force.

“This is a truly historic moment for people everywhere. The two key thresholds needed for the Paris Climate Change Agreement to become legal reality have now been met,” said Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
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“The speed at which countries have made the Paris Agreement’s entry into force possible is unprecedented in recent experience of international agreements and is a powerful confirmation of the importance nations attach to combating climate change and realising the multitude of opportunities inherent in the Paris Agreement,” she said.

In a statement issued before the threshold for ratification of the Paris Agreement was crossed, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: “Strong international support for the Paris Agreement entering into force is testament to the urgency for action, and reflects the consensus of governments that robust global cooperation is essential to meet the climate challenge.”

The Paris Agreement was adopted in Paris, France at the UN climate conference in December 2015. In order to enter into force, at least 55 Parties accounting for at least 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions were required, with the Agreement then entering into force 30 days later.

Entry into force bodes well for the urgent, accelerated implementation of climate action that is now needed to realise a better, more secure world and to support also the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals.
Patricia Espinosa, executive secretary, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
Today, the UNFCCC secretariat tracker shows that the number of Parties that have ratified, accepted, or approved the Agreement now covers over 55 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. This includes the biggest and smallest emitters, the richest and the most vulnerable nations.

“Above all, entry into force bodes well for the urgent, accelerated implementation of climate action that is now needed to realise a better, more secure world and to support also the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals,” Ms. Espinosa said.

“It also brings a renewed urgency to the many issues governments are advancing to ensure full implementation of the Agreement. This includes development of a rule book to operationalise the agreement and how international cooperation and much bigger flows of finance can speed up and scale up national climate action plans,” she added.

Consequences of entry into force
Entry into force triggers a variety of important consequences, including launch of the Agreement’s governing body, known as the CMA. In the parlance of the UN climate change process this stands for the Conference of the Parties to the Convention serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement.

Given that the count-down to entry into force has now been formally triggered, the CMA will take place at the upcoming annual UN climate conference, known as COP22, in Marrakesh, Morocco from November 7-18. Precise dates will be announced in the coming days.

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Moreover, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) – national climate action plans – of Parties which have joined or subsequently join the Agreement transform into Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), which can always be resubmitted as more ambitious plans at any point. A key feature of the Agreement is that these plans can be strengthened at any time but not weakened.

“Climate action by countries, companies, investors and cities, regions, territories and states has continued unabated since Paris and the full implementation of the agreement will ensure that this collective effort will continue to double and redouble until a sustainable future is secured,” said Espinosa.

Governments will also be obligated to take action to achieve the temperature goals enshrined in the Agreement – keeping the average global temperature rise from pre-industrial times below 2 degrees C and pursuing efforts to limit it to 1.5 degrees.

The fact that somewhere around one degree of this rise has already happened and global greenhouse gas emissions have not yet peaked underlines the urgency of implementing the Paris Agreement in full.

Another key milestone will be the successful conclusion of negotiations to develop the Paris Agreement’s implementation rule book. Completion of what is, in effect, a global blueprint for reporting and accounting for climate action, need to be completed as soon as possible.

Countries are also not starting from scratch. The many successful models and mechanisms for international climate cooperation set up under the UNFCCC over the past two decades, including the Kyoto Protocol, have built up a deep level of experience and knowledge on how this can be done effectively.

It is the completed rule book that will make the Agreement work and that will make it fully implementable, setting out the detailed requirements under which countries and other actors will openly report and account for the climate action they are taking in a way which promotes trust and confidence across nations to boost their own comprehensive response to the challenge of climate change.

Another key issue is to ensure that the $100 billion, pledged by developed countries to developing ones, is truly building in the run up to 2020 and that even larger sums are being leveraged from investors, banks and the private sector that can build towards the $5 to $7 trillion needed to support a world-wide transformation.

Securing a world which is safer from the extreme climate change that would undermine any attempt at future sustainable development will still take decades of rising action and constant improvement.

“The entry into force of the Paris Agreement is more than a step on the road. It is an extraordinary political achievement which has opened the door to a fundamental shift in the way the world sees, prepares for and acts on climate change through stronger action at all levels of government, business, investment and civil society,” said Espinosa.